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23
Jan

Sales Position Available

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog

Position: Associate Agency Producer
Salary: Commensurate with experience
Benefits: Medical, dental, life insurance, disability protection, AFLAC, paid vacation and holidays, 401(k)
Company: Reilly Benefits, Inc.

Job Description: The Associate Producer seeks to acquire clients who wish to purchase health and dental insurance plans.

Responsibilities:
 Sales and marketing in the Maryland, VA, and Washington DC area
 Community outreach through traditional networking and through social media outlets
 Presentation of plan options and rate comparisons
 Assisting clients through the application process
 Communications to include explanation of benefits
 Tracking of policies in progress
 Lead generation and prospect management
 Additional marketing projects and responsibilities as assigned

Qualifications:
 Two or four year college degree
 Health/Life license desired but not required
 Computer skills: Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, and Outlook)
 Basic understanding of social media (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter)
 Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal
 Strong presentation skills
 Strong organizational skills
 Fast learning skills

Reilly Benefits is a small insurance and employee benefits consulting agency, located in Southern Anne Arundel County, Maryland. The firm has an energetic and enjoyable company culture. We’re looking for a member who wishes to be part of a close working group, someone who will contribute thoughts and ideas as a means to strengthen the team. The position offers opportunity for advancement.

06
Jan

Healthcare Rationing with Obamacare?

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, health care reform, PPACA

It depends upon the way you look at it.

A little known provision included in the healthcare law includes a new tax for health insurers.  Beginning in 2012, insurers will be required to pay $1 per member as a means to finance comparative effective research.  This fee rises to $2 in 2013.

The goal of comparative effectiveness research is to determine which procedures and approaches to health management achieve the most successful and cost effective results.  Does medicine A produce better results than medicine B?  Does one procedure outperform another procedure?  Do differences exist by geographic region?  By population segment?    By medical school?  By insurance company?

These are all of course good questions that should be answered, and a tax of dollar or two doesn’t sound so bad to pay for the research.  Understanding which medications and procedures produce the best and most cost effective results would provide enormous help in controlling health costs.

Now to be sure private industry already conducts comparative research.  But a general distrust of insurance companies and the inevitable pushback from plan participants (and from politicians) of any suggestion to change or limit choice diminishes the potential investment.  It’s driven by profit margin, many say.

Now Obamacare charges the duty to the federal government.  Makes sense.  After all, federal officials don’t make decisions based upon profit margins, right?  They have no interest in steering patients to specific hospitals or to replace higher cost medications with lower cost alternatives, do they?  They wouldn’t limit choice or procedures based upon cost, would they?

Comparative effectiveness is important.  It’s necessary.  And it’s integral to the survival of the U.S. healthcare system.  Insurance companies have pursued their own research for years.  Now the federal government will lead the way.  The question is this.  What will the government do with the research?

 

25
Aug

Courts Decide on Health Care

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, health care reform

The passage of ObamaCare divided Congress and divided the country.   More recently it’s divided the judiciary.

As expected, dozens of lawsuits have been filed against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act since its final passage in March of 2010.  The most-watched cases challenge the individual mandate, the idea the government can require a citizen to purchase a specific insurance plan or face a tax.

To date five district courts have ruled on the individual mandate.  Three courts have upheld the law, Eastern Michigan, District of Columbia, and Western Virginia.  And two courts have struck it down: Eastern Virginia, and Northern Florida.

Next up are the Courts of Appeal.   There have been two decisions so far with the Sixth Circuit upholding the Eastern Michigan case and the Eleventh Circuit agreeing with the Northern Florida court to strike down the law down.

Still to rule is the Fourth Circuit to settle the split decisions from the two Virginia cases.  And the District of Columbia Circuit will hear its appeal in September.

If you’re scoring, that’s four courts to uphold the mandate, three courts to strike it down, two appeals still pending.   The judiciary is split, some decided, ultimately undecided.   But do any of these lower decisions really matter?   After all, it was concluded with that fateful Christmas Eve vote in 2009 that the U.S. Supreme Court would decide the issue.   So, in the meantime, aren’t we just following process and reading headlines?

29
Jul

CLASS Act be Repealed

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, health care reform, PPACA, premium costs

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act includes a provision to develop a federally sponsored long term care program known as the Community Living Assistance Services and Support Act(CLASS Act).  The law requires theDepartment of Health and Human Services to release details of the program by October 1, 2012.  The program will likely begin enrolling members in 2013.

Americans 18 and older and actively at work will be eligible to enroll.  Employers who elect to participate will automatically enroll workers but workers will have the ability to opt out.  With no exclusions for pre-existing conditions participation will be highly selective and the program will disproportionately attract unhealthy members.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated the monthly premium cost at $123 on average, yet according to a white paper released by The Cato Institute earlier this year premiums could actually be in the range of $180-$240.  Cost will dissuade participants as will a requirement that premiums be paid for five years before benefits become available.

Cash benefits will be paid directly to a qualified participant who experiences a loss of at least two activities of daily living (ability to eat, dress, bathe, etc).  Payments are expected to be no less than $50 per day on average and there is no provision to limit benefits on a lifetime basis.

Only 6% of the population is expected to enroll according to estimates provided by the American Academy of Actuaries.  This number could be much lower given the voluntary nature of the program, the expense, and the five year vesting period.

The CLASS Act is doomed.  Low participation and adverse selection will render the program unsustainable.  The CBO is concerned it becomes “a new federal entitlement program with large, long-term spending increases that far exceed revenues.” and the bipartisanCommission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform suggests a repeal if the program cannot be “reformed” in short order.  Reform?  The healthcare law was supposed to be reform!  Repeal is better than reform, at least for the CLASS Act.

18
Jul

ObamaCare

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, health care reform

A notable letter to the editor, printed in The Capital (Annapolis, MD), Friday July, 15, 2011. Enjoy!

Just so I understand this correctly, we’re going to be “gifted” with a health care plan we are forced to purchase and fined if we don’t, which will cover approximately 10 million more people without adding a single new doctor.

It was written by a committee whose chairman says he doesn’t understand it, passed by a Congress that didn’t read it, and signed by a president who smokes.

At least we can take comfort in knowing that nothing can possibly go wrong, because the funding will be administered by a treasury chief who didn’t pay his taxes, overseen by a surgeon general who is obese, and financed by a country that’s already broke. Only in America.

Ken Barlow
Annapolis, MD

15
Jul

Carriers Pay Maternity

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, education, health care reform, income protection

Maternity benefits are eligible events in most short term disability policies. They fall under the illness schedule as opposed to the injury or accident schedule (even if the pregnancy occurred accidentally!) Policies begin to pay claims after a waiting period for either type of event. Payments for injuries or accidents usually begin before illness events. For example, a policy may offer income payments as of the first day of an accident while the policy may require a one week wait before payment for an illness. Waiting periods differ from policy to policy.

Under most policies, maternity claims are generally payable for a maximum of six weeks from the date of the delivery. This is standard industry practice based upon general medical guidelines. Complicated deliveries and extenuating medical conditions can of course allow for an extension of claims.

Here’s a quick class. If a policy requires a one week waiting period before payments begin, and if a participant stops working on the actual day of the delivery, then the plan will begin the waiting period on the date of delivery, which leaves the participant with only five weeks of eligible claims left of the six available. But considering many doctors send participants home for bed rest before the expected date of delivery, the maximum benefit changes. This is because the waiting period begins on the day the member is sent home as opposed to the date of delivery. For example, if the plan requires a one week wait, and if a doctor sends the member home one week prior to the delivery date, then the member has the opportunity to satisfy the waiting period while at home before the delivery date. The policy will then still pay the industry standard maximum of six weeks once the delivery occurs.

Similarly, if a participant leaves work four weeks early for bed rest due to doctor’s orders the policy will then pay a maximum benefit of nine weeks of claims. This is because the member satisfies the one week waiting period starting from the date the member went home. Claims payments then begin three weeks before the delivery date while the member remains unable to work at home. Once the delivery occurs the policy will still pay the industry standard maximum of six weeks once the delivery occurs.

To simplify…. just remember that maternity claims are generally paid for six weeks from the date of delivery. The policy waiting period starts as soon as the member takes leave. If the leave occurs before the delivery date, then the member receives more weeks of payment. If the leave occurs on the delivery date, then the member receives fewer weeks of benefit.

13
Sep

IRS W-2 Health Ins.

Written by dreilly. Posted in Blog, compliance, employee communications, health care reform

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) requires employers to report the value of employer-sponsored group health insurance on an employee’s annual W2 form.  The amount to be reported in box 12 is considered non-taxable, at least for the time-being.

The law originally required employers to report this information beginning with the tax year 2011, but the IRS has postponedimplementation.  Now, employers that file more than 250 W2 forms, measured by the preceding calendar year, are required to report the health cost beginning with tax year 2012 (reportable January 2013).  Employers that file fewer than 250 W2 forms are required to report the health cost beginning with tax year 2013 (reportable January 2014).

In calculating the total reportable cost, the employer will combine the portions of the annual premium paid by the employer and the employee.  The annual cost of dental or vision coverage is excluded unless such coverage is integrated with the health plan.  Costs associated with contributions to a health savings account (HSA), Archer medical savings account (MSA), or flexible spending account (FSA), are also excluded from the total.

While postponing this reporting requirement gives employers some breathing room, the beginning of tax year 2012 is just around the corner.  Larger employers must have a system in place to begin tracking and recording employee health plan costs by January.  Smaller employers have an additional year.   Time is short.  Are you prepared?

See IRS Notice 2011-28 Interim Guidance on Informational Reporting to Employees of the Cost of Their Group Health Insurance Coverage for more detail.


Testimonials

'The commitment Reilly Benefits makes to our company to ensure our benefits and claims are handled promptly and correctly goes beyond that of any agency I have seen in my 20 years of working with insurance brokers.'

Karen Siebert, CFO
Great Mills Trading Post

'Our experience with Reilly Benefits has been very positive. The courteous and friendly staff has taken care of our every need. Their knowledge and dedication have afforded us the opportunity to thoroughly explain the benefits and importance of insurance coverage to our employees. I would highly recommend this organization to any individual or business for all types of insurance or tax planning.'

Dottie Wyatt, Controller
Atlantic Cycle & Power
'We rely on the recommendations of Reilly Benefits to provide plan options for our employees in a way that controls our costs and we feel great relief knowing that they keep us abreast of health care legislation and other issues that affect the managemnent of our plans.'

Regina Anderson
Vice President
Dennis Anderson Construction
'Our experience with Reilly Benefits has been very positive. The courteous and friendly staff has taken care of our every need. Their knowledge and dedication have afforded us the opportunity to thoroughly explain the benefits and importance of insurance coverage to our employees. I would highly recommend this organization to any individual or business for all types of insurance or tax planning.'

Dottie Wyatt, Controller
Atlantic Cycle & Power

'The commitment Reilly Benefits makes to our company to ensure our benefits and claims are handled promptly and correctly goes beyond that of any agency I have seen in my 20 years of working with insurance brokers.'

Karen Siebert, CFO
Great Mills Trading Post

Benchmarks

Reilly Benefits, Inc. works with employers in a wide variety of industries. This allows us to understand the uniqueness of specific benchmarks within certain industries and among different market sizes.

Our ability to help employers compare and contrast a benefit plan to these benchmarks provides our clients an advantage in the ultimate goal to attract and retain quality employees.

Professional Employee Benefits Specialists

Contact us

Reilly Benefits, Inc

5419 Deale-Churchton Rd. Churchton, Md. 20733

Professional Employee
Benefits Specialists

Telephone: 1-410-867-0261

Fax: 1-410-867-0262
info@reillybenefits.com

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